Table of ContentsI. Introduction
II. General
III. Background
IV. Treaties
V. Conflict
VI. More Conflict
VII. Decline
VIII. Sources

Romance of the West
Romance of the West

I. Introduction
Many Americans tried to force the west to match their image of it, romance, last frontier, virgin land, gold rush. That meant above all, ensuring that the Indian tribes would not remain obstacles to the spread of the white society
II. General
There was almost incessant fighting between whites and Indians from the 1850s to the 1880s, as Indians struggled against the growing threats to their civilizations. Indian warriors usually traveling in parties of thirty to forty men, attacked wagon trains, stagecoaches, and isolated ranches, often retaliation for earlier attacks. As the United States Army became more deeply involved in the fighting, the tribes began to focus more of their attacks on the white soldiers.
III. Background
During the Civil War, white troops stepped up their wars against the western Indians on several fronts. But it was not only the United States military that threatened the tribes. It was also unofficial violence by white vigilantes who engaged in what became known as Indian hunting. Tracking down and killing Indians became a kind of sport. The collection of Indian scalps was used to prove their deeds
Goerge Armstrong Custer
Goerge Armstrong Custer

IV. Treaties
Treaties negotiated in 1867 brought temporary lull to many of the conflicts. But new forces soon shattered the peace again. In the early 1870s more waves of white settlers, mostly miners, began to penetrate some of the lands in Dakota Territory, supposedly guaranteed to the tribes in 1867. Indian resistance flared anew, this time with even greater strength.
V. Conflict
They united under two great leaders, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull. The Seventh Cavalry, led by George Custer, set out to round up the Indians and force them back onto the reservation. The tribal warriors surprised Custer and 264 members of is regiment, surrounded them, and killed every man. This is known as The Battle of Little Big Horn, one of the most controversial conflicts between Indians and Whites.
Chief Joseph
Chief Joseph
But the Indians did not have political organization or supplies to keep their troops united. Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull accepted defeat and went back to the reservation.
VI. More Conflict
One of the most dramatic episodes in Indian history occurred in Idaho in 1877. The Nez Percé were a small and peaceful tribe. They were under pressure to move to a reservation. Chief Joseph, persuaded his followers to flee from the expected journey to the reservation. The Nez Percé scattered and were eventually caught by General Nelson Miles. Chief Joseph surrendered to Miles in exchange for the Nez Percé territory. However the government refused to honor Miles' promise and the Nez Percé were shipped to reservations.
VII. Decline
The interests of the Indians were not compatible with those of the expanding white civilization. Whites successfully settled the American West only at the expense of the region's indigenous people.
VIII. Sources
http://www.pbs.org
http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com
American History; Brinkley
United States History: Preparing for the Advanced Placement Examination; Amsco